Elon Musk to build amphibious car

26th June 2014
Posted in Uncategorized

Of all the cars James Bond has driven, and destroyed, probably only one is more well-known than the Aston Martin DB5, and that’s the Lotus Esprit submarine that Roger Moore drove off the end of a pier, along the sea bed, and onto the beach, in The Spy Who Loved Me. For years the stuff of fantasy, now billionaire Elon Musk (the man behind PayPal and Tesla) has revealed he plans to build one for real.

 

The story first gathered legs in October last year, when an unknown buyer bought the original movie prop at auction for over half a million pounds. Bond’s Lotus spent several years in a storage container before it was discovered by the person who bought the container without knowing its contents. It subsequently was displayed in museums and shows before being put up for sale. Currently it only functions as a submarine and can’t be driven on land.

 

Musk’s version will be slightly larger than the car from the film, and the company will only build a few, less than 10. It will use the Tesla electric powertrain, and the car electrics will need to be fully-secured against water ingress. It will be a lengthy project no doubt, and naturally a very expensive one. But imagine being the first to have a go at driving it into the water!

 

Ian Fleming of course had a thing about cars that had a little more under the hood besides the usual. Besides the Lotus Esprit, there was also the flying car in The Man With The Golden Gun, and Fleming also of course wrote Chitty-Chitty Bang-Bang.

 

We love this kind of eccentric but far-sighted thinking at Hall’s Electric – where would British industry be without the spirit of innovation? Most of our customers will never get the chance to drive one of these vehicles, but if your car does suffer water damage to its electrics, then bring it in to one of our centres and let our qualified technicians take a look – we can give you a quote straightaway and soon have it back on the road (or in the sea).

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